Why my church is providing support for foster parents

Irmo, South Carolina is a special place to me. It’s the place where, four years ago, my husband and I were assigned on Call Day at the Seminary to Hope Lutheran Church. It’s where we brought both our daughter and son home. It’s where I now call home and where I have been blessed to be part of a congregation that is on fire to serve its surrounding community.

But our church had a problem that many churches can experience. 

While we wanted to serve others around us, we were missing a straight-forward, accessible, and meaningful approach for serving our community.

How to help kids in foster care without being a foster parent

When children arrive to a foster home, their world has been shattered and they are they are experiencing the effects of trauma and neglect. 

Foster parents are charged with putting their world back together—reassuring the child(ren) of their safety and stability by providing a nurturing place for them to call home. In addition, foster parents are responsible to schedule and attend doctor, therapist, court, and parental visitation appointments plus maintain the day-to-day demands of caring for the basic needs of their family.  

Children that are in foster care are hurting due to struggles that most of us cannot fathom. It is important that foster families have what they need to care for these little hearts and souls 

Teams of professionals are summoned to help the biological family address their barriers and needs, but few resources exist to support the foster family with the same care and attention. This is where we are called to help.

Myths and Joys of Being a Foster Parent

Are you thinking about becoming a foster parent? Has God planted that whisper in your heart, too?

I’d like to share some of the myths and some of the joys that I’ve experienced as a foster mom—by far my favorite “job” that I’ve ever had.

Posted by Cindy S. on 13 February 2020

Am I in an Abusive Relationship?

Understanding what an abusive relationship looks like is a key step toward getting help.

But abuse can be hard to spot, especially when it is not easily visible. When we think of abuse, it is common to think of physical abuse because it results in scars and bruises that we can see.

Yet physical abuse is just one kind of abuse that can happen. Abuse can also be emotional, sexual, psychological, financial, or spiritual. For Emily, the abuse she endured was emotional and financial.

What to do if you think your friend is in an abusive relationship

How to help survivors of domestic violence

Knowing how to help a survivor of domestic violence or intimate relationship violence can seem like an overwhelming challenge. Several questions can flood your mind when you are presented with the opportunity to help someone who confides in you that they are surviving abuse.

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