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Bringing Inclusivity to the Classroom

We owe teachers a lot.

This pandemic has made us all appreciate the hard work of teachers, day in and day out. When school went online in the spring of 2020, it caused a lot of us to realize how valuable it is having qualified, trained teachers to lead our students. 

Class subjects, social skills, and problem-solving are all valuable lessons kids learn at school. But for six-year-old Jayden, school was not possible. 

While there are resources, educators, and learning strategies for students with disabilities in the United States, the reality is different on the island of Grenada. Limited training and guidance leaves many teachers feeling helpless as they struggle to provide meaningful instruction. And their students often feel left out, misunderstood, or simply don't attend school. This was the situation Jayden found himself in. 

What sharing the gospel looks like in Malawi

To an outsider, Malawi seems like a country full of opportunities to serve. It regularly ranks as one of the poorest countries in the world by gross domestic product. HIV/AIDS, malaria, and poor access to clean drinking water all contribute to an average life expectancy of just over 60 years.*

But Malawi is also a place of unparalleled beauty. The people are welcoming and kind. Their history is mostly peaceful. And 77% of Malawians are Christian.

Combine all these factors and you’ll find no shortage of non-governmental organizations (NGO) working in Malawi. In fact, there are over 500 registered NGOs in the whole country. From nonprofits focusing on agricultural aid to religious organizations caring for orphaned children, there’s no shortage of “help.”

Which then begs the questions:

  • What does effective help really look like?
  • Who gets to decide what help is actually needed?
  • And how can we help share the gospel if so many people already know Jesus?

Three ways to tackle difficult conversations about faith

I was eating french fries when I had my first challenging conversation about faith. 


Now I’ll be honest, before this moment I thought I was completely prepared to talk about any aspect of my faith. I was fully convinced that, if challenged, I would be able to spew forth such a brilliant argument that even a die-hard atheist would become Christian. I should also mention that I was only 14 years old and full of that youthful “immortality” mindset that made me believe I could conquer anything.

One of the people in my friend group at lunch asked if I believed that the flood actually happened, to which I responded, “Yes.” Immediately I was met with a hailstorm of questions.

The link between an identity in Christ and a healthier life

As coordinator of the Health and Wellness Program for Kingdom Workers, I am often asked,


“How does your program connect people with Jesus?”


The truth is that health and gospel proclamation go hand-in-hand. In this post I'll be sharing how our program in Chile connects health and identity with sharing the gospel message, and how you can do the same in your own life. 

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