Three ways to tackle difficult conversations about faith

I was eating french fries when I had my first challenging conversation about faith. 

Now I’ll be honest, before this moment I thought I was completely prepared to talk about any aspect of my faith. I was fully convinced that, if challenged, I would be able to spew forth such a brilliant argument that even a die-hard atheist would become Christian. I should also mention that I was only 14 years old and full of that youthful “immortality” mindset that made me believe I could conquer anything.

One of the people in my friend group at lunch asked if I believed that the flood actually happened, to which I responded, “Yes.” Immediately I was met with a hailstorm of questions.

Are you listening?

When I was in college, I struggled with an eating disorder for 8 months. My junior year had some rough patches and without realizing it, my harmless attempt to lose a little bit of weight warped into an unhealthy habit.

I put myself through intense workouts every morning at 5am and kept a list of every single piece of food I ate throughout the day. I was hungry all the time. I would binge eat and then starve myself for the next day out of guilt for letting myself consume more than 1,500 calories.

Deep down, part of me knew what I was doing was unhealthy, but the way people commented on how good I looked kept me from reaching out for help. 

4 Steps to Help Survivors of Relationship Violence

Survivors need love and support, and to feel physically and emotionally safe before change can begin. This safety extends to their spiritual well-being. Abusers convince survivors that they are worthless, and that God doesn’t love them. They need to be encouraged by the truth of God’s love—that He died to redeem them because of that love.

As witnesses, recognizing abuse or knowing how to help a survivor is challenging; it makes us uncomfortable. But being able to push past the discomfort and reach out can save lives.

3 ways to help kids in foster care

Someone once said, "You will know you've found your calling from God if the cause you are working for brings you to tears." I have found this to be very true in my life, and that is why my family has become involved in foster care. Every time I think about kids who are hurting, neglected, or abused, it brings me to tears, and I feel compelled to do something to help. I feel moved to be part of the solution.

 

"You will know you've found your calling from God if the cause you are working for brings you to tears." 

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