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Love does not...

How do you know if something is abusive? Start by looking at what love does...and does not. 

Your Winter Toolkit: Helping Survivors of Abuse

Survivors of relationship abuse need your help this winter.

Last spring, law enforcement and community agencies around the United States reported that the number of calls for help dramatically decreased as stay-at-home orders became the norm. That’s good, right? Unfortunately, it’s not good. Numbers went down because survivors were unable to leave an abuser and safely report the abuse. They were stuck at home, under an abuser’s thumb 24/7. The pandemic and its accompanying restrictions presented barriers to getting help. Because a survivor was with the abuser more often, they had fewer chances to seek outside help and support.

4 Steps to Help Survivors of Relationship Violence

Survivors need love and support, and to feel physically and emotionally safe before change can begin. This safety extends to their spiritual well-being. Abusers convince survivors that they are worthless, and that God doesn’t love them. They need to be encouraged by the truth of God’s love—that He died to redeem them because of that love.

As witnesses, recognizing abuse or knowing how to help a survivor is challenging; it makes us uncomfortable. But being able to push past the discomfort and reach out can save lives.

Am I in an Abusive Relationship?

Understanding what an abusive relationship looks like is a key step toward getting help.

But abuse can be hard to spot, especially when it is not easily visible. When we think of abuse, it is common to think of physical abuse because it results in scars and bruises that we can see.

Yet physical abuse is just one kind of abuse that can happen. Abuse can also be emotional, sexual, psychological, financial, or spiritual. For Emily, the abuse she endured was emotional and financial.

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